Capturing Incredible.

Left Split Supercells 101

0 1

On some storm days, supercells sometimes split into more than one storm.

We call these storm splits by which direction they move after the split occurs. A right-splitting storm will typically turn right and have a counter-clockwise or cyclonic rotation — what you would expect a supercell to do in the Northern Hemisphere. These are the storms we expect to produce the greatest amount of severe weather

Right split storms will produce the severe weather you expect from a supercell including large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes.

However, the left-split storms can be quite interesting all their own. These storms typically rotate backwards, and have a reverse appearance to a more typical right split.

These counter-clockwise (anti-cyclonic) rotating storms will have an appearance that is typically more like a Southern Hemisphere supercell, with the downdraft to the south of the updraft.

This is opposite from what you would typically expect, but it is one really good way to spot a left splitting storm visually.

Left-splits typically produce some large hail as their primary threat. In fact, on days where large hail is favored, left-splits can sometimes feel a bit ‘supercharged’ with some exceptionally large hailstones. In the video below, the left-split we look at produced hailstones of baseball size which was far larger than the right splits on that same day.

Video

On some storm days, supercells can sometimes split into more than one storm. We call these storm splits by which direction they move after the split occurs. A right splitting storm will typically turn right and have a cyclonic rotation — what you would expect a Supercell to do in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the left split storms can be quite interesting all their own. These storms typically rotate backwards, and have a reverse appearance to a more typical right split. In this view, we are looking west at a left Split. Notice something strange? The precipitation core, or downdraft, is located to the south of the Updraft. This is backwards from what you would typically expect, and is one way to spot a left splitting storm. This storm produced hailstones of baseball size — as with many left splitting storms, their severe weather potential is still high with large hail the most common threat. #storm #weather #sky #nature #instaweather #instanature #natureza #instaweatherpro #stormchasing #thunderstorm #stormysky #stormy #skylovers #igsky #video #atmosphere #science #badweather #stormyweather #naturelovers #instanature #greatplains #stormchasers #tornadoalley #thunderstorm #tornado #lightning

A post shared by Tornado Titans (@tornadotitans) on

 

Comments
Loading...